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Motion for Contempt

Motion for Contempt in Tampa

A motion for contempt is a request to the court to force someone to comply with the terms of a previous court order. Once you move for contempt, you will need to attend a hearing during which the court will hear both sides and determine whether contempt has occurred. In divorce court, contempt motions may be appropriate if a party fails to pay court-ordered child support or alimony, fails to abide by the timesharing schedule, fails to provide discovery, or fails to participate in the court-ordered distribution of marital property. Generally, sanctions for civil contempt end when the party in contempt complies with the court order, or the underlying case resolves. Civil contempt can result in punishment including orders to do or not do something, monetary damages, and even jail time (although jail time is not typical).

Motion for Contempt Solutions

Contempt motions may be necessary during your underlying divorce or paternity case, or they may become necessary post-judgment, once you already have your final judgment. Regardless, hire Open Palm Law to prosecute or defend against motions for contempt.

FAQs for Motion for Contempt

Judges use civil contempt sanctions to coerce a person into complying with a court order the person has violated.

Criminal contempt charges are punitive, meaning they serve to deter future acts of contempt by punishing the offender no matter what happens in the underlying proceeding.

Direct contempt occurs in the presence of the court, usually during a court proceeding. Indirect contempt occurs outside the presence of the court.