Call Us: (813) 870-3839

Our Address: 3839 West Kennedy Boulevard, Tampa, Florida 33609

Find us on Social Media:

Menu

Family Law Explained

What Our Clients Say

Client Resources

Choose Your Fate: Seven Courtless Divorce Options

Custody & Visitation

Alimony & Spousal Support

Popular Articles

Time Heals

Find An Alternative Way To Divorce   I’ve said it so many times . . . there is magic in the collaborative process.

Read More »

Mediation

Mediation in Tampa

Mediation is a form of alternative dispute resolution. It is a dynamic, structured, interactive process where a neutral third party assists disputing parties in resolving conflict through the use of specialized communication and negotiation techniques. Mediation may be initiated by the parties or may be compelled by legislation, the courts, or contractual terms. Private sessions are confidential. If the parties reach an agreement, the mediator or a party’s attorney will draft the agreement for the parties’ signatures. The process is typically less formal than litigation and gives the parties more control of their process and outcome. The mediator has no power to render a resolution to the conflict; instead, the parties fashion the solution as the mediator moves through the process. Mediation can be beneficial because it is less costly and timely than litigation.

Mediation Solutions

The attorneys at Open Palm can either act as your family law mediator, or they can represent you as your attorney during your mediation sessions. As trained mediators, they are skilled in the art of negotiation, which benefits their clients in whatever capacity they serve.

FAQs for Mediation

While you are not required to be represented by an attorney during a divorce mediation, an attorney who specializes in family law will ensure that you receive all you are entitled. At the very least, you should have an attorney available telephonically with whom you can consult during your mediation as questions arise.

If you are unable to resolve your dispute without mediation, the judge will likely order you to attend mediation.

No. While many family law attorneys are also family law mediators, a mediator is a neutral party, and as such, s/he cannot represent a party in both capacities.